The Future Of Regenerative Tissue Therapy

As an alternative to invasive surgeries or long-term pain management regimens, BioStem’s tissue allografts tap the human body’s own tools for healing — which has the potential to radically redefine care across therapeutic categories.

The Future Of Regenerative Tissue Therapy

As an alternative to invasive surgeries or long-term pain management regimens, BioStem’s tissue allografts tap the human body’s own tools for healing — which has the potential to radically redefine care across therapeutic categories.

Redefining Care Through Regenerative Medicine

For addressing pain, injury, and the effects of disease, patients deserve non-addictive treatments that preserve quality of life. That’s why BioStem Life Sciences is committed to producing human tissue-based products for healing and regeneration that adhere to the industry’s highest standards, going over and above current good tissue practice (cGTP) standards to ensure the safety of our products.

With a focus on patient safety and continual drive to innovate, our tissue engineers leverage years of experience to extract, purify, and preserve tissues for use in advanced allograft technology. Our ultimate goal is to use the power of regenerative medicine to help people looking to heal after surgical intervention or disease, those who want to avoid narcotics for chronic pain or those who have been let down by traditional avenues of care.

The Science Behind a Growing Class of Therapies

At BioStem, we develop, manufacture, and market placental tissue products that tap the healing potency of the amniotic membrane. The amniotic environment is rich in growth factors and peptides associated with the generation of new tissue, and because amniotic tissues are also immunologically privileged, they are also highly biocompatible.1-3 This reduces the risk of host rejection reactions that could potentially complicate treatment and produce adverse effects.4,5

To request general product information or for more specific questions, please feel free to contact us.

References: 1. Tao H, Fan H. Implantation of amniotic membrane to reduce postlaminectomy epidural adhesions. Eur Spine J. 2009; 18(8):1202-12. 2. Tseng SC, Li DQ, Ma X. Suppression of transforming growth factor-beta isoforms, TGF-beta recep__tor type II, and myofibroblast differentiation in cultured human corneal and limbal fibroblasts by amniotic membrane matrix. J Cell Physiol. 1999; 179(3):325-35. 3. Hao Y, Ma DH, Hwang DG, Kim WS, Zhang F. Identification of antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory proteins in human amniotic membrane. Cornea. 2000; 19(3):348-52. 4. Islam R, Rahman S, Asaduzzaman SM, Rahman MS. Properties and Therapeutic Potential of Human Amniotic Membrane. Asian J Dermatol. 2015; 7(1):1-12. 5. Kubo M, Sonoda Y, Muramatsu R, Usui M. Immunogenicity of Human Amniotic Membrane in Experimental Xenotransplantation. Investigative Opth & Vis Sci. 2001; 42(7): 1539-46. 6. Niknejad H, Jorjani M, Ahmadiani A, Ghanavi J, Seifalian A. Properties of the Amniotic Membrane for Potential Use in Tissue Engineering. Eur Cells & Materials. 2008; 15: 88-99. Raines AL, Shih MS, Chua L, Su CW, Tseng SC. O’Connell J. Efficacy of Particulate Amniotic Membrane and Umbilical Cord Tissues in Attenuating Cartilage Destruction in an Osteoarthritis Model. Tissue Engineering Part A. 2017; 23(1-2). 8. Wang HS, Hung SC, Peng ST, Huang CC, Wei HM, Guo YJ, et al. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Wharton’s Jelly of the Umbilical Cord. Stem Cells. 2004; 22: 1330-1337.